Archive

Tag Archives: Rice

JAPANORAMA - Seven Monkey BANNER JAPAN-O-RAMA.jpg01 Baby Cart to Hades Tomisaburo Wakayama, Akihiro Tomikawa , Go Kato, Yuko Hamada, Isao Yamagata, Michitaro Mizushima, Ichirô Nakatani, Akihiro Tomikawa, Sayoko Katô, Jun Hamamura, Daigo KusanoLone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart to Hades (子連れ狼: 死に風に向う乳母車, Kozure Ôkami: Shinikazeni mukau ubaguruma): Ogami Itto saves the honour of a prostitute, which leads to more work as a hired assassin. It’s yet another film that’s packed with effortless cool – slicing down the bamboo trees, ninjas fall down, Bish! Bash! Bosh! Corpses everywhere! This is definitely more wordy than the previous two outings, and the first half is overly similar to a previous story (protecting prozzies honour). The second half isn’t that memorable either, at least not until the absolute bloodbath of a finale. Wakayama plays his character with far more grit than before, he’s colder, and his dialogue is delivered with the most authoritative growl you could imagine. Poor kid though, how much bloodshed should one child be exposed to!?!? Another big game-changer is that this is the first movie in the series to feature guns, which takes the edge – and part of the appeal – from the sword fighting / showdowns. Whilst it’s not a bad film, Baby Cart to Hades isn’t really in the same league as the first two movies, and feels like it’s re-treading some plotlines.

Score: 5.5/10

02 Baby Cart To Hades Tomisaburo Wakayama, Akihiro Tomikawa , Go Kato, Yuko Hamada, Isao Yamagata, Michitaro Mizushima, Ichirô Nakatani, Akihiro Tomikawa, Sayoko Katô, Jun Hamamura, Daigo Kusanom03 Baby Cart to Hades Tomisaburo Wakayama, Akihiro Tomikawa , Go Kato, Yuko Hamada, Isao Yamagata, Michitaro Mizushima, Ichirô Nakatani, Akihiro Tomikawa, Sayoko Katô, Jun Hamamura, Daigo Kusano04 Baby Cart to Hades Tomisaburo Wakayama, Akihiro Tomikawa , Go Kato, Yuko Hamada, Isao Yamagata, Michitaro Mizushima, Ichirô Nakatani, Akihiro Tomikawa, Sayoko Katô, Jun Hamamura, Daigo Kusano05 Baby Cart to Hades Tomisaburo Wakayama, Akihiro Tomikawa , Go Kato, Yuko Hamada, Isao Yamagata, Michitaro Mizushima, Ichirô Nakatani, Akihiro Tomikawa, Sayoko Katô, Jun Hamamura, Daigo Kusano06 Baby Cart To Hades Tomisaburo Wakayama, Akihiro Tomikawa , Go Kato, Yuko Hamada, Isao Yamagata, Michitaro Mizushima, Ichirô Nakatani, Akihiro Tomikawa, Sayoko Katô, Jun Hamamura, Daigo Kusano07 Baby Cart to Hades Tomisaburo Wakayama, Akihiro Tomikawa , Go Kato, Yuko Hamada, Isao Yamagata, Michitaro Mizushima, Ichirô Nakatani, Akihiro Tomikawa, Sayoko Katô, Jun Hamamura, Daigo Kusano


IP Man (AKA Yip Man) [Blu Ray]:
partial-biogaphy of grandmaster martial artist Yip Man, as he fights to protect his town through the Japanese invasion of 1937. This is a jaw-dropping homage to the old martial arts films; choreography, subtle wire work, sound effects and filming of the action. This all peaks during a 1-on-10 fight indoors, which is action-tastic, bone-snappingly brutal and phenomenal to watch. Storywise, the film starts off amazingly with random schools of martial artist groups challenging each other to fights, but as soon as the war / Chinese history kicks in it slows the film down to a crawl. Annoyingly, there’s random leaps forward in time about every ten minutes; is it a week, month or year… we don’t know. Outdoors the BD picture great, but inside it’s very grainy – and the entire second half (invasion) looks depressingly washed-out and devoid of any colour. Films that handle the SinoJapanese war have a tough job, and IP man succeeded nationally (although falls down internationally) in doing this; because it’s over-sentimental – but you can’t hold that against such a nationally proud, historical piece. Overall, IP Man starts with a massive bang, but the entire second half becomes a bit of a struggle, although the great action will keep you in your seat.

Score: 7/10